4 Simple Diverticulitis Home Remedies fruit healthTips

Diverticulitis home remedies will benefit if you have a mild case of diverticular disease. You
can use them to prevent severity of this colon problem. When you get the feeling that you have diverticulitis you should immediately stop taking junk food, caffeine and other such type of food. You have to give your colon rest in order to heal and to return it to normal condition. You will definitely not want it to get worse.

Regarding the daily meals, instead of taking three large meals, you should start taking five or six short meals. Also, the food you take must be beneficial to your health and easy on the digestive system. Here is a list of some home remedies which will help to relieve the pain and soothe your digestive system.

1) Garlic: Garlic can be used for a wide variety of purposes. It has this property of helping and improving the digestive system. It is also useful to remove harmful substances from the body when taken in adequate quantity. Taking a clove of garlic for 1-3 times a day will soothe and help to prevent your condition from worsening.

2) Papaya: Papaya is another home remedy for diverticulitis which is commonly used for helping in digestion. This fruit is the only one containing a natural digestive aid known as papain, which cleans the digestive track. Take a good ripe papaya from the market and you can use it in different forms like a juice, with honey, along with other fruit etc.

3) Pear: You can use this fruit to soothe the inflammation. Usually they are eaten just like that but you can bake them or drink juice.

4) Brown Rice: Most people in the world eat white rice but brown rice is far better for your digestive system if you care. It is also rich in fiber and helps to reduce the inflammation in the colon. So you should start taking brown rice for your own good.

The main reason for diverticulitis condition is low fiber diet which is common in our lifestyle. Taking adequate quantity of fiber will definitely soothe and reduce this condition. For your diverticulitis home remedies you can include the fruits, vegetables and other foods which have good quantity of fiber in them. You will see your health improving with time.

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Jambalaya Pots – A Resume of Important Tips cuisines

The Jambalaya tradition is alive and well and spreading far and wide, well beyond its Cajun origins in Louisiana. If your thinking about getting into Jambalaya cooking there are a few things its good to know.

Jambalaya pots are multi-purpose; they are great for stews, soups, gumbos, popcorn and much more. You can cook nearly all types of food using cast iron cookware so these pots are the supreme example of large scale ‘anything goes’ cooking equipment

Cast iron pots are a great cooking medium with near perfect heat conduction and heat retention they are very efficient, heating evenly & consistently without heat spots.

There is one piece of advice that is paramount, don’t buy cheap. A Jambalaya pot is an investment that your grand children’s children will be enjoying, so buy well. Remember, by comparative standards they are not expensive and when measured over their extended lifetime they are incredibly cheap.

As a simple piece of advice, we have found that the Bayou Classic range of jambalaya pots are superb, they represent the very best in Jambalaya cookware.

Jambalaya pots are ideal for outdoor cooking but they can be a little heavy, especially the larger models. This said the common advice from users is, if you think you’ve chosen the right size then go for the next size up as there surely will come a time when you’ll have need of it. This said do also bear in mind that when going from say, a 7 gallon up to a 10 gallon pot you’re going from being able to serve 60 people, to being able to serve 100.

It’s really healthy to cook with cast iron jambalaya pots because you can cook fat free as a properly seasoned Jambalaya pot will be non-stick so it requires no oil for cooking.

Jambalaya pots are easy to clean:

  1. once the pot is cooled, wash it using normal washing up liquid, then rinse and dry with a paper towel; don’t listen to those that say just wipe it out; this is not hygienic.
  2. after washing put the pot onto the stove/burner to completely dry it out; then before its cooled very lightly oil with a vegetable oil; then leave it on the stove for a few minutes; then take it off the stove and wipe away any excess oil with a paper towel;
  3. after drying your cookware you should never store it with its lid on as this can allow moisture to build up inside, resulting in rust! To help avoid this it can help to put a paper towel inside the pot to absorb any moisture; and
  4. if you do experience rust, scour with steel wool, until the rust is gone, wash and re-season.

Finally here are just a few dos and don’t when cooking with your Jambalaya pots:

  1. Don’t use your pot for boiling water.
  2. Always preheat your pot before starting cooking. The temperature is right when drips of water sizzle then jump around. Its too hot if the water turns to steam straight away and too cold if the water just bubbles.
  3. Never pour cold water into a really hot pot as it may shatter. And
  4. Never touch the jambalaya pot when cooking as it gets really hot. Keep a good pair of very heavy duty oven gloves handy if you must touch it or move it.

Is a Vegetarian Det Appropriate For Dogs? fruit healthTips

Feeding a vegetarian food to your dog is a personal decision probably decided because of your own personal preferences. the Vegetarian Society has a lot of information on feeding a veggie diet to your dog, particularly how to ensure the basic nutrients are provided. They suggest that if your dog has been brought up on a meat diet, make the changeover to a vegetarian diet gradual.

With active dogs there is a problem of bulk versus energy and readers are advised to consult their vet for guidance to ensure that sufficient energy can be obtained from the amount of food given.

Vegetarian feeding of cats is not generally recommended because cats are obligate carnivores – that is, they need meat in their diet. The Vegerarian Society has info on cats.

The main problem with natural feeding of a veggie diet would seem to be the sheer bulk of food needed to ensure full and complete nutrition, and the variety of foodstuffs needed to make up such a diet (click here for more info)

There are a large number of ingredients that you can incorporate into the diet:

Vegetables – Green vegetables are a great way of boosting your dogs immune system, you can feed these raw or cooked. Raw carrot makes a healthy treat. Vegetables are possibly better for dogs than fruit. Potato must be cooked, and mashed potato is a suitable ingredient for home cooking.

Fruit – in the wild, dogs would have scavenged windfall fruit as well as digesting the remains of fruit eaten by other animals when they pick over the carcass, so giving your dog fruit is not as strange as it might sound. Fresh fruit is packed full of anti-oxidants, vitamins and all sorts of other healthy nutrients, so it’s great for keeping your dog in top condition. Some fruits are quite acidic (as well as sugary) and may not be good for dogs with skin or digestive complaints.

Grains – Rice is universally recommended, and brown rice preferred, but make sure that it is well cooked so that your pet can get the maximum goodness.

Fish – Vary the protein that you are feeding, so that a good range of amino acids is provided. Fish, particularly oily varieties are a good source of omega 3 and 6 oils.

Yoghurt – this is a great source of protein, calcium and vitamins, and is particularly good for dogs with diarrhoea thanks to the probiotics it contains.

Cottage cheese – another surprisingly healthy dairy food which is great for growing puppies and lactating bitches.

Brewer’s yeast – Can be purchased from health food stores or chemists as a food supplement and is full of nutrients and vitamins. You only need to use about 1/2 tsp a day with recipes.

An alternative is to look at the small number of complete vegetarian foods available for dogs which have a declared analysis that meets nutritional guidlines. Feeding amounts on these can be higher than equivalent meat based foods (i.e. 650g for a 30kg dog as compared to 3-400g with meat based foods) so do follow the recommended feeding rates.

You should be aware that not all Veterinary Surgeons are happy about the nutritional adequacy of home cooking – there are issues regarding vitamin, mineral and micronutrient content.

A recent field study presents a survey of the primary reasons for choosing a vegetarian diet and an outline of the most frequent nutritional imbalances found in these diets.

The survey consisted of personal interviews. Owners were asked to fill out a questionnaire to provide a detailed account of their pet’s diet and medical history and to present their dogs and cats for clinical examination.

If possible a blood sample was drawn. Energy and nutrient intake of the animals were calculated and compared with requirements. Additionally, twelve prepared complete vegetarian dog foods were investigated.

A total of eighty-six dogs were investigated in Germany, Switzerland and Belgium and applications continued to arrive after the survey was finished. By contrast, only eight cats were found which currently were fed a vegetarian diet.

With few exceptions, the survey’s participants were also vegetarians who believed that animals should not be killed in order to provide meat and/or that meat production was carried out in a way which was cruel to the animals and detrimental to the health of consumers.

The protein intake was inadequate for over half of the dogs. Nutritional errors typical of all homemade diets also occurred in the vegetarian diets.

The calcium requirements were not met in 62% of the dogs’ diets, likewise for phosphorus, which was below standard for roughly half of the dogs. This resulted in an unbalanced Ca/P ratio.

In addition, 73% of the dogs had an insufficient intake of sodium. In many cases, the supply of trace elements was inadequate. A high number of the plasma samples also showed insufficient amounts of iron, copper, zinc and iodine. Of the vitamin contents calculated, vitamin D was most often below recommendations.

Here also, a reduced plasma content of 25-OH-vitamin D was common. Fifty-six percent of the dogs showed a vitamin B12 intake below recommendations. Despite the fact that some of the diets were unbalanced, no clinical problems were found in the adult dogs.

The protein intake of the cats was not far below the requirements, although the amount of S-containing amino acids was frequently inadequate. None of the cats in the study were provided with enough taurine although products containing taurine were used.

Similar deficiencies to those of the dogs in minerals and trace elements, as well as vitamin D and B12 were found in the cats’ diets. Vitamin A intake was deficient in all cases, and in all but two cases, cats had insufficient amounts of arachadonic acid. One cat showed symptoms of retinal atrophy and two displayed reduced frequency of estrus.

The mineral and vitamin content of the prepared vegetarian petfoods frequently did not provide a balanced diet for a dog’s nutritional needs. Only two of the twelve products that were analyzed can be recommended without reservation.

Source: E. Kienzle and R. Engelhard. A field study on the nutrition of vegetarian dogs and cats in Europe. From Proceedings of Sixth Workshop in Pet Food Labeling and Regulations. p. 139.

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My 3 Favourite Recipes From Kenya cuisines

With 52 tribes in Kenya, extending from the coast to the Rift Valley lakes to the central highlands to the northern desert, the cuisines found in this country are many and varied. There is also a strong Indian influence as the spice traders started coming to Africa centuries ago and have remained to trade in various other goods since. Here I present three dishes commonly found around Nairobi. Two – the matoke and mukimo – are traditional Kikuyu dishes from the central highlands, and the chapatti is from the coast.

Chapatti

Ingredients (makes 15-20 chapattis):

½ litre cold water

1 kg flour

Salt

Sugar

Oil

Method:

Mix water with flour, add a handful of salt, a bit of sugar and a bit of oil (the oil makes the chapatti turn golden when it cooks). Divide the mixture into balls the size of a child’s fist. Roll out each ball to a flat circle about the size of a dinner plate. Fry on a very hot, oiled chapatti pan (flat fry pan) for about 2 minutes on each side or until golden brown.

Matoke

Ingredients:

Plantains (these are green bananas that are starchy and not sweet)

Tomatoes

Cooking oil

Potatoes

Water

Onions

Parsley

Capsicum

Salt

Method:

Peel the plantains and potatoes and soak for about half an hour. Meanwhile fry onions, tomatoes, parsley, capsicum and salt. Add potatoes and plantains to the fried tomato mix. Cover with water and add salt to taste (the salt also helps soften the plantains quickly). Stew over medium heat until the plantains and potatoes are cooked through.

To cook minji (peas), maharagwe (beans, usually red kidney) and njahi (black beans) follow a similar recipe. Boil the peas or beans for several hours until soft. Fry up the tomato mix described above, add potatoes and water. Finally add the peas or beans and mix together over low heat.

Mukimo

Ingredients:

Beans (red kidney beans usually)

Maize kernels

Onions

Tomatoes

Potatoes

Method:

Boil beans and maize (generally equal amounts of beans and maize) until soft, this usually takes a couple of hours. In another pot, cook onions, tomatoes and potatoes until soft. Then add the beans and maize. Now you have githeri another popular Kikuyu dish (my favourite!). However, to get to mukimo, cook the stew for another 30 minutes before mashing it all together. The maize is tough to mash so don’t worry about the kernels staying whole. The beans and potatoes will mash easily though.

Some versions of mukimo do not use beans; instead use a leafy green vegetable such as kale or spinach which mashes with the potato to make the mukimo green.

The quantities depend on your taste and how many you are cooking for. Generally for mukimo you want equal quantities of beans, maize and potatoes with the onion and tomato simply adding some taste. For matoke the plantains should be more than the potatoes, about a 2:3 ratio. Again the tomato fry mix is simply to add taste so you don’t need too much. For the chapattis the flour should be twice the amount of water with sugar and salt to taste.

I would love to hear about your experiences with Kenyan food – whether you have cooked it yourself or been cooked for. Please leave your comments below.

Mexican Cookware – Equipment Used in Mexican Cooking cuisines

Mexican cooking at home doesn’t have to an impossible task to accomplish. Try using the following kitchen equipment for the next in-home Mexican meal.

Comal: Basically, a comal is a cast iron griddle and is used without oil. It’s flat with a handle and is used for making tortillas and roasting foods that require no oil. Mexican comals also can be made of clay.

Molcajete and Tejolote: Mortar and Pestle, these are used for crushing and grinding herbs, spices and seeds. The bowl and grinder are made from porous volcanic rock and are still used today. You can also make traditional Mexican salsa in the Molcajete and Tejolote.

Prensa (Tortilla Press): A tortilla press can be metal or wood, with two hinged plates and a handle. A tortilla press is used to flatten the dough for making tortillas.

Tamale Steamer: Tamale Steamers can be purchased at any Mexican cuisine store or market or you can make one yourself. Using a large enough stock pot to fit a metal colander lined with foil in the bottom, pour about an inch of water in the pot. The foil keeps the tamales from touching the water. Place the tamales in the colander and cover with a clean kitchen towel. Cover the pot tightly with a lid.

Cazuela: a clay pot or bowl still used in Mexico today for boiling corn, stews and beans. Though many Mexican households now use Olla Express (Pressure Cooker) to make beans, they still place the beans in a cazuela for the final few minutes of cooking to give beans that authentic Mexican flavor.

Metate y Mano (Hand Grinder): This tool looks like a short 3 legged table with a concave surface about the size of a platter. A large cylinder of stone is used for grinding spices, herbs and seeds. You can also find larger versions made for sitting at. Metate y Mano is made from stone or lava rock and is still used today in many Mexican households.

Molinillo (Wood Whisk or Stirrer): This ancient tool is used to create foam in hot chocolate. Place between your hands and rotate the whisk back and forth briskly. Molinillos can be plain or highly decorated.

Olla: A bean pot made of clay. Most Olla’s are beautifully decorated and glazed. Cooking beans in an olla gives beans a far superior taste than cooking them in metal pans or even a slow cooker. Olla’s look beautiful sitting on the counter when not in use and make a great gift. Fill the pot with bags of beans and seasoning and give to your friends or relatives who love authentic Mexican cooking.

Most of the cookware mentioned above can be purchased online, in a specialty Mexican market or store.

Can’t wait to learn more about Mexican cooking? Visit Mommies Magazine for more Mexican Cooking Techniques that you won’t want to miss.