Sahara Desert-Plants – Crops cuisines

Being a desert, many people would not assume the Sahara desert produces a healthy crop of edible plants. Nevertheless, the Sahara desert is home to several species of plants that nourish its residents, and even provide a lucrative business option. The plants in the Sahara are a staple in the day-to-day lives and diets of the Sahara populace. There are five plants in particular that are most frequently cultivated and eaten.

The first of these plants is the orange tree. Most North Americans think of Florida and California when it comes to the orange crop, even though the Sahara desert offers plenty of its own oranges in its dry, hot landscape. The trees grow particularly well along the coast of the Nile and in various other areas in the Sahara that have an oasis.

A heavily used herb in American cuisine is thyme, which thrives naturally in the Sahara, as well as several additional herbs. Thyme in particular is considered food to many of the animals that inhabit the Sahara desert, while the locals cultivate thyme to add flavor to their meals.

Figs are also grown in the Sahara desert. While it may be difficult to picture these soft, tasty fruits growing in desert environments, figs play a significant role in the diet of Sahara residents and have done so for ages.

Another fruit native to Africa and the Sahara desert is the magaria. Magaria are fruit similar in size to the cherry. They are a muted brown color and are typically dried to use in cake batter.

While the olive tree will often make one think of Italian olive groves, this plant is also native to the Sahara desert, growing best in many areas bordering the Nile. It is a very useful and vital plant to the desert’s ecosystem as well as its business structure, as the olive tree is a profitable resource.

The term Sahara desert plants typically brings to mind thoughts of the cacti that also populate the area, or even the unusual gourds that cannot be eaten, but help to heal bites from a scorpion. As far as Sahara residents go, however, the most vital vegetation of the whole area are the plants consumed daily as food.

Food Additives That Cause Insomnia, Restlessness and Anxiety fruit healthTips

So you think fresh fruit and vegetables are great for your health? Perhaps not. There are many food additives that are actually harmful and can lead to insomnia, restlessness, anxiety and many other problems. And some of them are used on fresh fruit and vegetables. But that’s not all. There are a range of food additives that have been isolated that can cause insomnia, anxiety, restlessness, depression, wakefulness, irritability etc.

Australians Sue Dengate and Dr Howard Dengate have researched food additives and food technology for many years. The following information and statistics come from their DVD “Fed Up With Children’s Behaviour.”

Firstly let’s look at Sue Dengate’s term “Food Intolerance” because it is not the same as a food allergy. Some of the symptoms are the same as allergic reactions, but can include other symptoms such as irritable bowel symptoms etc. Many food intolerance’s have a delayed reaction time (2 – 3 days), some are accumulative, and many are very difficult to isolate and identify. Most people have no idea of their food intolerance’s!

There are no scientifically proven tests for food intolerance. Reactions can sometimes take weeks to get over. That is why we need some expert help on this subject.

In the 1950s 20% of our food items were controlled by the supermarkets, now the figure is about 80%. It is increasingly important to know what you are eating and how it is affecting your health, mood, sleep, skin, behavior, headaches, bowel movements etc.

Migraine sufferers have tripled since the 1970s with over 20% of households now containing at least 1 migraine sufferer.

The prevalence of eczema has increased 2-3 fold since the 1970s. About 1 Australian in 3 is affected at some stage in their lives.

Irritable bowel syndrome is now thought to affect about 20% of people living in developed countries compared with almost zero in countries with traditional eating habits.

Asthma has risen from about 10% in the 1970s to about 30% today. Asthma is the leading cause of school absence. Most sufferers react to one of two food additives. 20% of sufferers are affected by salicylates. The majority can be helped by avoiding food additives. Even the asthma medications themselves contain additives that adversely affect sufferers!

Since the 1990s there has been a dramatic increase in the use of anti-depressant medications, including for young children, and including 3000 prescriptions to babies under 12 months of age in the USA alone! There has been a 10 fold increase in major depression since 1945.

Since the 1970s rates of autism are thought to have increased 10 fold in the USA.

Just because a food additive is called ‘natural’ doesn’t mean its safe!

So here are some examples of nasty food additives to avoid if you’re having difficulties sleeping, waking in the middle of the night, waking too early, feeling anxious, overly tired, depressed, stressed, etc:

o The common bread preservative (or mould inhibitor) 282. Calcium propionate (282)’s symptoms (from eating quantities of bread) can include difficulty getting to sleep, night walking, night terrors, unexplained tiredness, depression, irritability, growing pains, bed wetting, nasal congestion and restlessness;

o Wakefulness, depression, restlessness, irritability (320 BHA Buylated Hydroxyanisole antioxidant – banned in Japan and may be unlisted in products containing less than 5% vegetable oils);

o Salicylates. There’s a factsheet on salicylates that includes information relevant to tinnitus, reversible hearing loss, vertigo, symptoms of Meniere’s Disease, insomnia, changes in children’s behavior. Of particular interest here is the information on how ‘good old fruit and vegetables’ are not always good at all. Find out about low salicylate fruit and vegetables vs. high salicylate fruit and vegetables, and how to control your intake;

o Wakefulness in young children (102 Tartrazine colouring and 110 Sunset Yellow colouring);

o 621 Monosodium Glutamate flavor enhancer MSG. Restlessness, wakefulness and irritability; and

o 951 Aspartame artificial sweetener – banned for US air pilots. Mood alteration (anxiety, agitation, irritability, depression), insomnia, fatigue.

It’s also very unfortunate that some nasty food additives do not have to be declared on the product labels – so you will need to investigate further to find out exactly which breads are the ones that don’t have the food additive that in linked with depression, etc. There’s also information on hair spray and air fresheners, it’s a must-read.

Sue has developed the Failsafe Diet to help people eliminate the nasty food substances from their system.

So if you find this article alarming, we’ve presented something valuable. Your responsibility is to research further to ensure that you, your children and loved ones aren’t diminishing their vitality by shopping carelessly. If you’re not already doing it, start reading the labels. And what’s more, if you do have a sleep disorder (or any other medical problem), you need to look further – because maybe there’s an additive in your food that doesn’t even have to be declared by law to be included on the label.

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Traditional Kobe Beef Recipes – Japanese Style cuisines

Everyone loves the Kobe beef. Not only because of its tenderness, it’s marbled richness, or it’s strong tangy flavour but also because of its versatility when it comes to cooking. Whether raw, sautéed, grilled, fried or what have you, the Kobe beef brings about some of the most delectable meals anyone could ever have. Even though food enthusiasts love the Kobe beef steak, popular traditional Japanese way of cooking still dominate because the special beef after all hailed from Kobe in Hyogo Prefecture Japan. The beef comes from what is called Wagyu or Japanese cattle hence it is also referred to as the Wagyu beef. The most popular Wagyu beef recipes from Japan include teppanyaki, sukiyaki, and shabu-shabu. Here’s how to prepare the softest and most succulent beef in such manner:

When making Wagyu shabu-shabu you must first slice 1 pound of Wagyu beef tenderloin or sirloin into paper thin slices. Cut one pound of Chinese cabbage, half a pound of watercress, half a pound of shirataki noodles, half a pound of enokitake mushrooms, half a pound of mushrooms, 6-8 shitake mushrooms, 1 pound of tofu, and 3 slices of kombu or seaweed into bite-sized pieces. Then you create a dip by combining 2 parts of soy sauce and only a part of lemon juice. The next step is to place all ingredients on a large platter. The Kombu slices should then be submerged in cold water then place over a stove. It should be removed right before the water boils. Once the slices are removed, keep the water boiling very gently. Now each person can cook their own meal by submerging one item into the pot at a time. The vegetables should be cooked first as the Kobe beef strips are so thin that they cook really fast.

For the Kobe teppanyaki recipe you’ll need a pound of cubed Kobe beef steak (sirloin of tenderloin), 12-18 pieces of shrimp, 2 large carrots, 2 large green peppers, 1 onion, 1 Chinese cabbage, 12 Shitake mushrooms, and Yakiniku sauce. First you must cut all ingredients into bite-sized pieces, then oil an electric pan and place the items in different sections of the pan. After cooking get a food item and dip it in the yakiniku sauce.

When making the Kobe beef sukiyaki recipe you’ll need the same amount and type of beef as the recipes above, half a pound of thinly sliced Shitake mushrooms, 2 large onions sliced thinly, 3 diagonally sliced celery stalks, cut bushel green onions, 3 cups of fresh spinach, 2 tablespoons of salad oil, and a 5-ounce can of bamboo shoots drained. For the sauce you’ll need half a cup of beef broth, 2 tablespoons of sugar, 2 tablespoons of sake, and 1/3 cup of soy sauce. Now the Wagyu beef must be cut into thin strips, about ¼ inch thick. Then heat oil in a skillet, and move meat to one side of the skillet mixing it with beef broth, soy sauce and sake sugar. Place onions, mushrooms, celery and the bamboo in separate areas or sections of the skillet then cover. Let the mixture simmer for ten minutes then add spinach and let it simmer for another 5 minutes. You may serve it over rice if desired.

Health and Nutrition During Pregnancy fruit healthTips

Pregnancy

Pregnancy is a nine month journey… It is a time in your life to feel happy, excited, serene and joyful. However it is also quite normal to experience anxieties about the birth and worrying about whether you are nourishing yourself properly, exercising, keeping, calm, positive, loving thoughts and emotions within your being.

Pregnancy lasts 39 weeks or nine months from conception and is looked at in three stages.

Health & Nutrition During Pregnancy

To ensure that your baby develops in a healthy environment, you should keep your body as fit and well nourished as you possibly can. Do not think in terms of devising a special diet for pregnancy, it is more to do with eating a good variety of the right foods which are those that are rich in the essential nutrients.

Weight Gain

The amount of weight put on by women in pregnancy varies between 9 – 16 kilograms, with the most rapid gain usually between weeks 24 and 32.

Don’t “eat for two”. Some 46 percent of women gain too much weight during pregnancy.

Diet During Pregnancy

You ARE What You Eat therefore Your Baby Is What You Eat!

What You Eat affects your baby’s future. What you eat in the following nine months can impact your baby’s health, as well as your own, for decades to come.

A good diet is vital to health during pregnancy, and to the normal development of the baby. The time to pay attention to diet, and if necessary change it for the better, is several months prior to conception and not when pregnancy is confirmed.

During the critical early weeks the normal, healthy development of the embryo depends on the mother’s state of nutritional health and also her toxic state.

Mineral and vitamin imbalances which would probably go unnoticed in a child or adult can have a disastrous effect on the developing baby.

This is because the cells in the embryo are growing at such a rapid rate, causing an exaggerated response to any harmful influences.

A natural, organic, whole food diet is the only one which will adequately serve during pregnancy.

A high quality diet is needed to maintain your own health and the best possible conditions for the baby to develop.

As our environment becomes more polluted and the soils more depleted of nutrients, going 100% organic, if possible, is the best thing you can do for oneself, and for a developing fetus, and last but not least; the environment.

Pesticides, herbicides, and other forms of pollution interfere with the metabolic pathways of many nutrients and thus indirectly interfere with the development of the immune, endocrine, and neurological systems.

Eating as many of our foods in their live, raw form preserves 70 to 80% more vitamins and minerals, 50% more bioactive protein, and up to 96% more bioavailable vitamin B12.

Grains, nuts and seeds are the most potent health-building foods of all. Eaten raw or sprouted if possible (some grains need to be cooked), they contain all the essential nutrients for human growth, sustenance, and ongoing optimal health.

A well balanced diet is based on whole cereals and grains (brown bread, rice, pasta, buckwheat, rye, oats), nuts and seeds, pulses and beans, fresh fruit and vegetables, pure unrefined oils such as cold pressed olive oil, with some fish and eggs if required.

Fruit and vegetables are all excellent sources of vitamins, minerals and trace elements provided they are eaten in the right way.

They should be fresh, either raw or quickly cooked, steamed or stir-fried, and preferably consumed immediately after they are harvested.

Salt is needed to maintain the extra volume of blood, to supply enough placental blood, and to guard against dehydration and shock from blood loss at birth, (except in cases of kidney and heart problems) Suggested form of salt is Himalayan Pink Salt.

Proteins

• Form the basic building blocks of all our body tissues, cells, hormones, and antibodies.

• Food must fuel the growth of the uterus, which can grow to 30 times its original size over the nine months gestation period Add the development of breasts, placenta, development of breast milk, the baby’s body.

Proteins are divided into complete and incomplete:

Complete proteins contain significant amounts of all the essential amino acids, you find them in meat, poultry, fish, eggs, milk and soya bean products.

Vegetable proteins are incomplete and contain only some of the essential amino acids. Some vegetarian sources of complete protein are: buckwheat, sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, flaxseeds, and almonds.

Plant proteins are easier for our bodies to digest and produce less toxic waste than animal proteins. The fiber in plants also has a very beneficial effect on the bowel; it ensures healthy bowel movements and the correct bacterial population in the gut, and prevents the buildup of putrefactive bacteria produced by excess animal proteins.

Eating meat and meat products also carries the risk from chemical and hormonal residues found in intensively reared animals. Also soya beans or soy products are mostly genetically engineered, hence it is wise to stay clear of them.

Pregnant women need about 60 to 75 grams of protein a day.

The best and cleanest sources of protein are green vegetables, spirulina, seeds (hemp, flax, sesame, poppy, sunflower, chia, quinoa, amaranth ).

Real strength and building material comes from:

• green – leafy vegetables, seeds and superfoods. They contain all the amino acids we require.

Essential Fatty Acids are vital to :

• the development of the baby’s nervous and immune systems. They build the cell walls in all our tissues, and so that trace elements and fat-soluble vitamins (A,E,D, and K) can be absorbed.

• EFA’s are needed to make adrenal and sex hormones, and to maintain a healthy population of bacteria in the gut.

• They are also essential to the normal development of the fetus’s brain: 70 per cent of all EFAs go to the brain.

The Best Fatty Foods include:

Avocados, Borage Seed Oil, Raw Cacao Beans (Chocolate Nuts), Coconut oil/ butter, Flax seed and its oil, Grape seeds, Hemp seed and its oil (cold pressed), RAW Nuts of all types (cashews must be soft to be truly “raw”), Nut Butters (almond butter is excellent), Olives and their oil (stone pressed or cold pressed), Peanuts (must be certified aflatoxin free), Poppy seeds, pumpkin seeds and their oil (cold pressed), Sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, tahini (sesame butter), or even better if you can get hold of it at a health food store unhulled tahini (an alkaline fat, high in calcium), Young Coconuts (young Thai coconuts are available in the US at Asian markets), Coconut milk, coconuts (mature).

SUPERFOODS

Superfoods are foods with extraordinary properties. Usually they contain all essential amino acids, high levels of minerals, and a wide array of unique, even rare, nutrients. I have included the superfoods in the nutritional tips below.

Some prominent superfoods to include:

1) Himalayan Pink Salt – offers 84 minerals exactly identical to the elements in your body.

2) Spirulina (a spiral algae consumed for thousands of years by indigenous people in Mexico and Africa)

-It has the highest concentration of protein on Earth. 60%

-It is also very high in Iron, and many other vitamins and minerals.

-It is one of the highest sources of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) on the planet. Only mother’s milk is higher.

-It is recommended to take more Spirulina during breastfeeding because of the GLA.

-Spirulina is very high in human-active B12.

3) Blue-Green Algae (Klamath lake algae wonderful brain food). It is high in protein, chlorophyll, vitamins, and minerals and enhances the immune system.

I value it in pre-pregnancy, pregnancy, and lactation for its enhancing effect on brain function.

4) Bee Pollen (wild pollen, not orchard pollen, should be used and should come from ethically harvested sources where bees are treated respectfully. Bee Pollen is nature’s most complete food) All amino acids, immune system, brain, eyes.

5) Flax, Sunflower, Chia, Sesame and pumpkin seeds are the best to use. Flaxseeds are excellent and the highest vegetarian source of omega-3-essential fatty acids, important for the immune system, nervous system, and brain development. I recommend one to two tablespoons daily of the uncooked and unheated oil or three to six tablespoons of freshly ground flaxseeds. (Use a coffee grinder). You may also grind the other above mentioned seeds and add them to salads, and fruit salads.

6) Wild young coconuts (not be confused with white Thai coconuts found in markets, wild coconuts are one of the greatest foods on earth. The coconut water and soft inner flesh are strength enhancing, electrolyte-rich, mineral-rich, youthening and invigorating. Great in smoothies.

NUTRITION TIPS

Here Are Some Nutrition Tips that will help you both:

1) Get Enough Folic Acid. 400 micrograms (mcg) daily. Folic Acid reduces chance of birth defects such as spina bifida. Especially in the first 6 weeks of pregnancy.

2) Best Food Sources of Folic Acid are: RAW Green leafy vegetables, including spinach, kale, beet greens, beet root, chard, asparagus, and broccoli. Starchy vegetables containing folic acid are corn, lima beans, green peas, sweet peas, sweet potatoes, artichokes, okra, and parsnips. Oats are high in folic acid as well as whole wheat brown bread. Many fruits have folic acid such as oranges, cantaloupe, pineapple, banana, and many berries including loganberries, boysenberries, and strawberries. Also fresh sprouts such as lentil, mung bean sprouts are excellent sources. REMINDER: Folic acid is available from fresh, unprocessed food, which is why it is so common a deficient in our culture’s processed, cooked food diet.

3) Eat Your Fish. Getting enough DHA (found in abundance in seafood and flaxseed) is one of the most important things you can do for you and your developing baby’s health. DHA is the omega-3 fatty acid that can boost baby’s brain development before birth, leading to better vision, memory, motor skills and language comprehension in early childhood. Eat at least 12 ounces a week of low-mercury fish, or take a DHA supplement such as Krill Oil.

• Avoid large, predatory fish such as shark, swordfish, king mackerel and tilefish. (As big fish eat smaller fish, the larger, longer-living ones accumulate more mercury).

• Seaweed and Cilantro remove heavy metals and radioactive isotopes from the tissues.

4) Avoid Alcohol – The main risk of consuming alcohol during pregnancy is the development of “fetal alcohol syndrome” (FAS). mother.. NO AMOUNT IS SAFE. AVOID TOTALLY.

5) Avoid Caffeine: In high amounts causes birth defects and still births, miscarriages and premature delivery.

6) Avoid Drugs – As far as possible all orthodox drugs should be avoided during pregnancy, especially in the first three months. Consider natural alternatives and visiting a medical herbalist or nutritionist prior to conception.

FOODS THAT MAY CAUSE INFECTIONS

Although the chance of contracting one of these rare infections is limited, you will reduce this likelihood even further if you follow the basic guidelines given here.

Listeriosis – caused by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, this is a very rare infection. Its symptoms are similar to flu and gastroenteritis and it can cause still birth.

Toxoplasmosis – usually symptomless (apart from mild flu symptoms), this can cause serious problems for the baby. Caused by direct contact with the organism Toxoplasma Gondi, it is found in cat faeces, raw meat, and unpasteurized goats’ milk. Soil on fruit and vegetables may be contaminated.

Salmonella – Contamination with Salmonella bacterium can cause bacterial food poisoning. This doesn’t usually harm the baby directly, but any illness involving a high temperature, vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration could cause a miscarriage or preterm labour.

HERBS TO AVOID DURING PREGNANCY.

Herbal remedies are for the most part quite safe to be taken during pregnancy; some are useful alternatives to drugs both in chronic illness and acute minor problems such as may arise during pregnancy. It is still preferable to take NO MEDICATION whatsoever in the first three months, unless there is a specific problem that needs treatment.

There are many Herbs which should never be taken in pregnancy – their emmonagogue or oxytocic properties may, in large amounts, cause uterine contractions and thereby risk miscarriage: I will only mention a few as there at least twenty on the list.

Nutmeg Myristica Fragrans

Thuja Thuja occidentalis

Calendula Calendula officinalis

Sage Salvia officinalis

Thyme Thymus vulgaris

Marjoram Origanum vulgare

Lovage Levisticum officinale

Rosemary Rosmarinus Officinalis

Rhubarb Rheum sp.

Herbs that are safe to eat to take in culinary doses but not as a medicine during pregnancy include:

celery seed, cinnamon, fennel, fenugreek, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage and saffron.

If you enjoyed reading this article and would like to read the full version of this e-book called ‘A Natural Approach To Pregnancy’, visit my website http://www.easyconsciousliving.com or e-mail me at: barbara@easyconsciousliving.com

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“The Doctor Of The Future Will Give No Medicines, But Will Interest His Patients In The Care Of The Human Frame, In Diet, And In The Causes Of Diseases.”

–Thomas Edison.

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Teff Flour and the Candida Diet cuisines

Have you ever heard of teff flour? I hadn’t either until I started experimenting with gluten free flours to use on the candida diet. Teff grass, botanical name Eragrostis tef, is an ancient grain that can thrive in a variety of extreme weather conditions, which makes it a very reliable grain choice. Teff grass is native to Ethiopia where it has been used for centuries as food for cattle and a component of building materials. Teff is the smallest grain in the world but despite its small size it is an extremely versatile grain. In Ethiopia today it is milled into flour and used to make a flat bread call injera, porridge and as an ingredient in alcoholic beverages. Although teff has proven to be a reliable grain it has gone pretty much unrecognized and unused in North America until now.

Increasing awareness of medical conditions such as celiac disease, autism, gluten allergies/sensitivities and candidiasis in which eliminating gluten from one’s diet is necessary or may be beneficial has brought non-glutinous flours such as teff to the forefront in North America. As we search for alternatives to our staple gluten filled grains, wheat, barley and rye, we are starting to search the globe far and wide for useful alternatives. Using teff flour as part of your diet to treat these conditions is of particular interest because teff flour has a very impressive nutritional profile when compared to that of other flours, both glutinous and non-glutinous. Teff flour contains a large amount of bran and germ which makes it an excellent source of dietary fiber, protein and iron. Teff is also a good source of calcium. Since teff flour does not contain gluten, is such a nutritional powerhouse and is slightly lower in carbohydrates than some other grains it is an ideal choice for the candida diet also known as the yeast free diet.

The candida diet is used to treat candidiasis, an overgrowth of yeast in the intestinal system. This is why it is often referred to as the yeast free diet, as the goal is to eliminate all foods and ingredients containing yeast and ingredients that feed yeast, in order to reduce the amount of yeast in the intestinal system. The biggest offenders tend to be sugar, processed foods, quick-acting carbohydrates, vinegar and fermented foods. Many candida diet resources also suggest giving up glutinous grains such as wheat, rye and barley because they are not only hard to digest, which puts an added burden on an already compromised digestive system, but gluten may also contribute directly to the yeast overgrowth problem by feeding the yeast. Symptoms of candidiasis include but are not limited to digestive problems, mental confusion, premenstrual syndrome, depression, eczema and acne.

The cornerstone of treatment for candidiasis is the candida diet. The candida diet is the most important part of the treatment but can be the most difficult part because of the amount of foods that are eliminated. Having options such as teff flour opens up new possibilities on the candida diet. Using teff flour along with other non-glutinous flours can help the candida dieter to create a variety of yeast free dishes. You can substitute teff flour for about one fourth of the flour called for in a recipe.

For more information on living yeast free by following the candida diet visit yeast free living.